Young people called on developed countries to fulfill their commitment to climate finance

Young people at the vanguard have urged on industrialized countries to swiftly implement their climate financing obligations, seeing the climate catastrophe as a life-and-death problem. To address this global challenge, climate scientists have advocated for youth leadership, low carbon emissions, a transition to renewable energy, nature-based solutions, compensation, and accelerated local adaptation in the decision-making process.

The remarks were delivered during an online discussion on “Youth, Climate Action, and the Commonwealth: Field Experience and Solutions” on Wednesday afternoon (March 10th). On Commonwealth Day, Youthnet for Climate Justice hosted a webinar in partnership with the British High Commission in Dhaka and the Commonwealth Secretariat.

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Under the presidency of Special Envoy of Climate Vulnerable Forum Abul Kalam Azad, State Minister for Water Resources Zahid Farooq MP spoke as the chief guest. Tanvir Shakil Joy, Member of Parliament for Sirajganj 1 and Chairman of Climate Parliament, Professor Salimul Haque, Climate Scientist, and Ken O’Flaherty, COP-27’s Asia-Pacific and South Asia Regional Ambassador, were among the special guests on the occasion.

Around 200 delegates from throughout the country attended the debate, which was led by Sohanur Rahman, a young climate activist.

“It is the youth who are the first to suffer owing to the environmental difficulties of our society,” stated State Minister for Water Resources Zahid Farooq MP, speaking as the chief guest. Bangladesh’s Delta Plan 2100 is the best present that the current generation can give to the next. By overcoming many long-term obstacles, including the negative consequences of climate change, the Delta Plan would ensure the country’s economic growth, water and food security, as well as environmental sustainability. The Delta Plan’s objective is to create a prosperous Bangladesh by adjusting to changing circumstances and implementing comprehensive and effective policies.

“We have to go beyond words,” stated climate scientist Professor Salimul Haque. Dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, dialogue, Then it will just be blah, blah, blah. We need immediate action, and it is up to the kids to handle it. He said this about the Loss and Damage Fund: “The repercussions of climate change are occurring all across the world, including in wealthy countries.” Victims are losing their jobs, their houses, and their crops. The question now is who will help recompense people who have been harmed.

Bishal Prasad, a campaigner with the Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change, a youth-led group in Fiji, and Leneka Roden, the Commonwealth Youth Climate Network’s organizer, spoke at the youth panel. International young speakers Humaira Ahmed Zeba from Sylhet and Shahin Alam from Satkhira shared their field experiences.

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